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by Tony Gomez

A year ago

Raising Book Resources

Raising Book Resources

A year ago

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By Tony Gomez

How To Raise Monarchs Book Resources Page

by Tony Gomez

A year ago

Find Your Supplies

MILKWEED

CATERPILLAR and BUTTERFLY CAGES

OTHER RASING SUPPLIES

Prepare Milkweed Plants

Hunt, Gather, & Protect Monarch Eggs

Feeding Monarch Caterpillars

Cage Cleaning Tips

Big Cat Care

Monarch Diseases and Prevention

Chrysalis Problems and Normal Development

Hatching Butterflies

Safely Release Butterflies

More Raising Monarchs Resources

3 comments


  • Hi Carol, this sounds like heavy OE infection. There’s more info about options for flightless butterflies in this post: https://monarchbutterflylifecycle.com/blogs/raise/hatching-butterflies-monarch-emerges-chrysalis

    Tony (Reply to Carol Dugan) on

  • Please help me! I have 2 butterflies left from yesterday with wing issues. One has 1 wing that is a bit tattered. The other has both wings folded and they have not opened since yesterday. Both are in the big net cage and moving around and fluttering their wings and eating from cotton soaked with hummingbird nectar food. Do I have to euthanize them? I don’t want to but don’t want them to suffer. The folded winged one tries to flap his wings often. I have seen the other one fly in the cage a couple of times – do I dare let him out and see what he can do? I have to keep them overnight now because it is hazy (from western smoke) and the sun is going down with 61 deg predicted for tonight, warm tomorrow and 66 tomorrow night. Please help me know what the right thing to do is. I will find it very hard to euthanize but I or better yet my husband can do it. Their 3rd cage mate flew out the door when I was bending down watching one of the others so I trust he is fine and will find a place to keep warm. This is my 1st attempt.

    Carol Dugan on

  • I started raising monarchs in 2015 when my mom went in the nursing home. There was a man there they called the butterfly man. I learned a lot from by sitting and talking to him. He built his own butterfly houses and when the butterflies were ready to be released the residents would come out to the garden and watch them being released. I’ve read many books and raised and released quite a few monarchs

    Dorothy Harrington on

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